Researchers developed Thought-controlled Robot to help people with disabilities

Americas, September 1 2011

Washington: Researchers have developed robots that can be controlled by the user’s thoughts and will be provide help for people with in future.

Robert Oschler looks at robot wears a kit that allows him to control the bot with his thoughts that he says could help people with disabilities interact with the physical world. Robert Oschler

Robert Oschler looks at robot wears a kit that allows him to control the bot with his thoughts that he says could help people with disabilities interact with the physical world. Robert Oschler

These avatars will “fill in” for those who are not able to physically attend – communicating for them, said science fiction author Robert Sawyer. “This is liberating for people with disabilties,” Sawyer told.

Paul Wilford, a senior research director at New Jersey’s Bell Labs, has developed a “telepresence” project called NetHead that will one day help people with disabilities to participate in meetings, join community groups, attend school functions, and even work in an office-all from a remote computer.

Robert Oschler, a freelance computer programmer, is developing a robot for people with disabilities. The robot can move around the room and communicate over a video feed.

The project, called Robodance 5, uses the Emotiv EPOC EEG headset to read facial movements, jaw clenches, and track eye movements.

“I trained the Emotiv system to react to my head and facial movements,” said Oschler.

“The system can be trained to create usable triggers using the 14 electrodes and the built-in gyro accelerometer on the Emotiv. For a person with locked-in syndrome [who does not have any freedom of movement], they would train a completely different set of triggers,” he added.

Other robotic systems are already helping people with disabilities. In the UK, a robot avatar named KASPAR (Kinesics and Synchronization in Personal Assistant Robotics), developed at the University of Hertfordshire, interacts with kids with autism.

Source: http://truthdive.com

Share this post: